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Social Loafing In Sport Definition Essay

Working In Groups And Social Loafing

Social loafing is the effect that people will exert less effort if they are working in a collective environment. Working in groups is an integral part of everyday life because it happens in almost every context whether it is sports teams, organizational groups, project groups and even juries. Therefore it is important to understand the underlying factors that influence this construct. The current research composed of 20 participants, investigated the social loafing effect of two working conditions: Coactive and Collective. It was hypothesized that collective groups would have significantly lower scores than coactive and the results supported this prediction strongly as there was a significant difference between the groups. These results have a strong implication that collective work teams are usually more prone to social loafing however; this could be minimized if certain factors such as interaction and complexity of the task were incorporated.

The extent to which Social Loafing occurs for participants completing a brainstorming task Coactively or Collectively
Social loafing is the effect of people exerting less effort when they are working collectively than when they are working coactively (Brickner et al., 1986). The effect of social loafing can occur in many contexts that can be reflected in tasks that require physical effort, cognitive effort and vigilance (Brickner et al., 1986). Létane (1979) suggested that social loafing is mediated by the equal distribution of effort and responsibility amongst a group task performance setting, thus participants held a mindset that they can “hide in the crowd” to avoid the blame for slacking off or even “blending in with the crowd” where they are unable to claim their credit of work. This proposal is consistent with various studies that came to similar conclusions, however it is important to note that the results may vary depending on the conditions.
Many researches on this topic have been examined to identify the factors associated with social loafing specifically in areas including sports teams, organizational committees and juries (Karau & Williams, 1993). Therefore it is important to understand the factors that motivate or demotivate individuals in those contexts in order to improve the collective outcomes that could generally be critiqued as unreliable or invalid due to the social loafing effect. Previous studies have indicated that the type of cognitive task performed mediates the effect social loafing. For example in challenging tasks that involved brainstorming or generating an ideas, the work teams had an opportunity to contribute their own unique ideas that made it more likely that they suffered consequences of social loafing (Robbins, 1995). Personal involvement has been said to mediate the effects of social loafing. This is a situation where the subjects have intrinsic value or personal meaning that play an important role in the participants lives (Brickner et al., 1986) As a...

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The Importance of Working Together in Groups and Teams

1079 words - 4 pages The Importance of Working Together in Groups and Teams Realizing that a group can become a high performance team is important. Accomplishing this goal is invaluable, advantageous and profitable. Once able to operate from a group to the high performing team is a great step into preparation into the big business world. Leaders and members must also realize not only how to accomplish this but that some problems will and can arise from different...

Social Groups and Organizations Essay

1502 words - 6 pages Social Groups and PAGE \* MERGEFORMAT 5 Running head: SOCIAL GROUPS AND ORGANIZATIONSSocial Groups and OrganizationsKelly BrutonUniversity of Phoenix OnlineSocial Groups and OrganizationsSocial organization is defined...

Social Class and Family Groups in To Kill a Mockingbird

1085 words - 4 pages How far do you think Harper Lee has effectively shown social class and family groups to be important at that time? The rigid class structure and social stratification of Maycomb County had a profound effect on the events in the novel To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. The impact of this class structure was especially evident in the trial of Tom Robins on, a Maycomb Negro. The extreme prejudice of the town eventually led to the unjust...

Title - Personal Insight Paper for Oragnizational Leadership, how as working adults we react in groups, commitees, and board of directors

948 words - 4 pages The Keirsey Temperment Sorter II results imply that I am an ESTJ (Supervisor) and the Strengths Finder Profile results suggest that my five top strengths are ideation, maximizer, input, arranger and command. In the following paragraphs I will identify what I do and how I integrate these strengths in...

What Held Societies and Social Groups Together

1281 words - 5 pages Durkheim was a social theorist whose main concern was the basis of integration and solidarity in human societies. Initially, his focus was society as a whole, later he brought his attention to examining rituals and interactions of people in face-to-face contact. Durkheim’s main concern was to analyze how societies could maintain their integrity and coherence in the modern era, when things such as shared religious and ethnic background could no...

Groups and Team in Management

566 words - 2 pages Groups can become a high performance team by following organizational goals and strategic planning, while demographic characteristics and cultural diversity can influence a team in many ways. Cultural diversity and demographic characteristics can help achieve goals and people should be aware how they can contribute to reaching goals in an organization. This paper will discuss the impact of demographic characteristics and cultural diversity on...

Living and Working in Space.

2257 words - 9 pages Contents1 Summary2 Eating and Drinking in Space3 Effects of Microgravity on the Human Body4 Personal Hygiene in Space5 Sleeping in Space6 Cleaning and Maintenance1 SummaryThere are many difficulties involved with humans living and working in space. Yet careful planning and an understanding of how the human body reacts to the conditions experienced in orbit of the Earth allow astronauts to...

Living and Working in Korea

792 words - 3 pages Ellen Moore Living and Working in KoreaHow do you think Ellen and Andrew can get the consulting project back on track?Ellen Moore, a systems consultant, was sent to Korea to manage a project involving a team of North American and Korean consultants representing a joint venture between a major Korean conglomerate and a significant North American information technology company. The Americans were to be involved for the first seven months in...

"Have" and "Have Not's", The Development of Social Groups.

1112 words - 4 pages People are naturally drawn to power and wealth. Power exudes an opulence, a bright center to an otherwise harsh or dreary existence. Over time social classes have emerged. In Egypt one may see a complex social pyramid, in India the same. For Rome one sees a simple social system. Plebeians and patricians, the "haves" and the "have-nots". This simple, two class system has evolved and one could almost say prospered over the generations that have...

This paper highlights the differences between the Han and Manchu social groups, as well as the various social clashes and changes which existed in 11th century Chinese culture.

663 words - 3 pages The Qing conquest of Ming China placed the numerically superior ethnic group of the Han Chinese under the rule of the outsider Manchurians. The Han Chinese had governed China by way of the Ming dynasty for nearly three hundred years, until the Manchu Qing Dynasty usurped the Ming through...

Differences Between Groups and Teams in Organizations

1133 words - 5 pages Groups and Teams Groups and teams are an important part of organisational infrastructure (Beersma, Hollenbeck, Humphrey, Moon, Conlon and Ilgen, 2005). Organisations form groups and teams in order to achieve organisational efficiencies and to aid in the growth and development of employees because they are found to be better than individual efficiency (Watson and Gallagher, 2005). However, groups and teams are often mixed up and confused for one...

Social Loafing In An Organization Essay

As the use of teams within organizations is increasing, there are some potential problems that arise from a group setting. One of the inherent problems, particularly more pronounced as teams get larger, is the phenomenon of social loafing (Feldman, 1985, pg. 234). Social loafing describes the phenomenon that individuals are more likely to exert less effort when working as a group than working as an individual. Such dysfunction in group dynamics within individuals impairs team effectiveness; and mitigates creativity and cohesion (Colquit, Wesson, LePine, 2009, pg. 417).

Owing to the growing importance of teamwork in organizational cultures and settings, the problem of social loafing needs to be understood and addressed effectively. Social loafing occurs because of many reasons: people's perception of other members of the group has an impact on their output, especially if there is a disparity in motivation and skills. A person is less likely to produce optimal performance if he/she believes that others in the group are less motivated or skilled than themselves, thereby reducing their own output. Also, goal setting is sometimes less ambitious because group members have a tendency to believe that the task will be easier when others are involved. However, the leading cause of social loafing is when individuals feel that their own efforts are not linked or discernable to the outcome in a group setting than when they are alone (Brilhart, 1995, pg. 26).

Understanding some of the sources of social loafing is paramount, but steps must be undertaken that can limit the effect of social loafing within a group. To the extent that individuals lack interest in tasks or goals because they simply feel that their efforts will not be met by others in the group, task designation and assignment takes a more imperative role. Individuals are more likely to contribute if a task is interesting to them, matches their strengths and challenges them (De Vita, 2001, 27). In this respect, they are more willing to contribute relative to their interest level. In addition, emphasizing goals and the importance of goals to each individual increases their stake in the group and engages them to perform better. To motivate consistent output, groups must engage their members and identify progress in tasks that are accomplished by each individual.

There is a natural tendency for people to be complacent if they know work will be dissipated within the group. In this context, establishing and clearly defining deliverables, goals and most importantly engaging and motivating each individual to accomplish goals is vitally important to remove this...

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Social Responsibility in business Organization Essay

2416 words - 10 pages Definition of business organizationBusiness organization is an organization that provides good or services in order to earn profit. Indeed, the prospect of earning profit is the different between a business's revenues and its expenses that is what encourages people to open and to expand business. The principal purpose of a company is not to make a profit. It...

Retaining Employees in an Organization Essay

2228 words - 9 pages In the course of their existence all people have experiences and respond to the roots and traditions of their culture, spirituality and the social, political and economic conditions in which they find themselves1. Shift from one organization to another is also a type of response. Employee retention is a process in which the employees are encouraged to remain with the organization for the maximum period of time. Retention of human resource is...

Audit Performance in an Organization

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Managing Technology in an Organization

2461 words - 10 pages Managing Technology in an Organization We define information technology (IT) to include not only computer technology (hardware and software) for processing and storing information, but also communications technology for transmitting information. Advances in computer and communications technologies have enabled firms to pursue IT investments. This will help them to gain maximum advantage from their knowledge assets-to leverage the knowledge of...

Strategic Alliance in an Organization

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The importance of ethics in an organization.

2825 words - 11 pages The term 'ethics' can commonly refer to the rules and principles that define right and wrong conduct of individuals (Robbins, Bergman, Stagg and Coulter, 2003, p.150). Ethical Behavior is accepted as "right" or "good" in the context of a governing moral code. Ethics can be viewed as a way of behaving that can be prescribed and imposed by the work environment (Garcia-Zamor,...

Importance of Leadership in an Organization

2063 words - 8 pages Leadership is one of the most important facets in organizations. In most cases, leaders act with respect to organizational culture as well as the codes of conduct that determine the manner in which leaders relate with subordinates. Leadership entails the use of effective communication skills to get activities done in the workplace and to ensure that employees shelve their individual interests for the sake of their organizations’ shared targets....

Knowledge Capture and Transfer in an Organization

2659 words - 11 pages Organization Background and Purpose of Planned Change The products that my organization supports, services, and provide updates to have been in the US Air Force inventory since the mid 1980’s. My organization’s make-up is multigenerational with a high percentage of Traditionalists and Baby Boomers (Fox, 2011). While the employees are skilled and talented, the organization is suffering from single threaded skill areas and we are facing the high...

Importance of Communication Systems in an Organization

2541 words - 10 pages Establishing and developing an efficient communication system is very important for any organization since it helps to communicate vital messages effectively throughout an organization. Usually it is the responsibility of a manager to implement a proper communication system in an organization. For an organization, having a superior communication will assist them in quality functioning in the planning, systematizing, leading and monitoring; in...

Management of Information Systems in an Organization

884 words - 4 pages Management of Information Systems in an Organization INTRODUCTION Management Information Systems are distinct from regular information systems in that they are used to analyze other information systems applied in operational activities in the organization.(1) In a recent survey article in The Economist, John Browning (1990) wrote: "Information technology is no longer a business resource; it is the business environment." His statement is not...

Operation Management in an organization (McDonald's).

6854 words - 27 pages IntroductionDescription of organizationThe organization in which the operation to be studied is one of the world's largest chain of fast food restaurants, known as McDonald's. The unofficial business first began in 1940 by Dick and Mac McDonald in California, with the official first

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