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Research Papers In Education 2012 Ford

Educational Research Review is a international journal aimed at researchers and various agencies interested to review studies in education and instruction at any level. The journal will accept meta-analytic reviews, narrative reviews and best-evidence syntheses.

Diverse types of reviews can be accepted:
• Research reviews: Reviews aimed at comparing research on similar or related topics.
• Theoretical reviews: Reviews able to critically describe the evolution of theories and the way they are understood in different contexts.
• Methodological reviews: Reviews devoted to methods and methodologies used in education.
• Thematic reviews: Reviews based on description of particular areas of the literature, or particular educational approaches or learning models.
• Theoretical contributions - state-of-the-art papers relating issues, comparisons, and analyses to the application of methods and models to the educational process.
• Research critiques - reviews on selected educational topics reflecting implications for the field of education.
• Forum Papers - shorter articles presenting new ideas, or responses to published material stimulating debate, but well founded in the existing literature.
• Instructional techniques - reports on instructional techniques when the use of adequate controls demonstrates the validity of the findings.

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2017 Research Papers

Writing Behaviors Relation to Literacy and Problem Solving in Technology Rich Environments (Iris Feinberg, Amani Talwar, Elizabeth Tighe, and Daphne Greenberg, The Adult Literacy Research Center at Georgia State University)
This paper will use PIAAC 2012/2014 data to study relations among the PIAAC literacy domain, the problem solving in technology-rich environments (PS-TRE) domain, reading behaviors, and various demographic characteristics (e.g., age, educational attainment, race, gender, and native language status) to adults’ writing behaviors at home and at work.  Specifically the researchers will address the following questions:

  1. What are the relations among the writing behaviors indices at home/at work and the reading behaviors indices at home/at work? Do these relations vary by demographic characteristics (age, educational attainment, race, gender, or native language status) and reading behaviors?
  2. Are PIAAC LIT and PSTRE skills jointly and uniquely predictive of writing behaviors indices at home and/or at work?  Do different demographic characteristics (age, educational attainment, race, gender, or native language status) and/or reading behavior indices at home/at work moderate the relations of LIT and PSTRE levels on writing behaviors at home and/or at work?
  3. What are the relations among functional daily reading behaviors at home/at work (reading directions, letters/emails, newspapers/magazines, books) and functional daily writing behaviors at home/at work (writing letters/emails, filling out forms)? Do these relations vary by demographic characteristics (literacy level, age, educational attainment, race, gender, or native language status)?

Revisiting the Determinants of Literacy Proficiency: A Lifelong-lifewide Learning Perspective (Richard Desjardins and Gina Cobin, University of California Los Angeles)
This paper will use PIAAC data to examine the determinants of literacy proficiency. Specifically, the authors aim to further examine the underlying structure of the determinants from a lifecycle perspective and the trends in this structure at both the micro and macro levels for countries that participated in both the PIAAC and IALS studies. The authors will address the following questions:

  1. To what extent has literacy proficiency changed since the 1990s and how does this relate to the growth of qualifications and knowledge economies as well as immigration in different countries? 
  2. What is the underlying structure of adult literacy from a lifecycle theory perspective? What indicators and pathways to adult literacy proficiency emerge from analysis of data from both the PIAAC and IALS studies?
  3.  What are the kinds of policy relevant insights that can be yielded from analyses of PIAAC type trend data regarding the determinants of adult literacy proficiency across specific contexts and across countries?

Collaboration at Work and PIAAC Skills (Joshua Collins, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities; Jill Zarestky, Colorado State University; Tobin Lopes, Colorado State University; and Ellen Scully-Russ, George Washington University)
This paper is focused on studying the relationship between level of collaboration, cooperation, and information sharing at work and respondents’ skills in literacy, numeracy, and problem solving in technology-rich environments. Specifically authors will address the following questions:

  1. How does the relationship between collaboration and information sharing and literacy, numeracy, and PS-TRE skill levels differ by gender, education, and industry sector?
  2. How does the relationship between collaboration and information sharing and adults’ use of specified skills differ by gender, education, and industry sector? 
  3. How is collaboration and information sharing related to U.S. adults’ participation in learning activities (e.g., open/distance education, on-the-job training, seminars/workshops, private lessons)?

What If A College Major Isn’t Enough?: The Relationship Between Measures Of Literacy And Numeracy Skills, College Graduates' Majors And Earnings (Karly Ford and  Junghee Choi, Pennsylvania State University)
This paper will use combined 2012/14 U.S. PIAAC data to study whether literacy and numeracy skills mediate the relationship between college majors and earnings. The proposed analysis would explore the role individual skill plays in the relationship between academic major and labor market earnings for college graduates.  The working sample includes only 4-year college graduates, between the ages 25 and 65. In order to observe only those with strong labor market commitments, the sample is limited to those who work full-time; those who reported working at least 30 hours a week. 


Using Log Files to Identify Sequential Patterns in the PIAAC Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environment by U.S. Adults’ Employment Status (Dandan Liao, University of Maryland; Qiwei He, Educational Testing Service; and Hong Jiao, University of Maryland)
This paper will use PIAAC 2012 process data collected in log files and existing data from the PIAAC survey, to identify malleable factors from employment-related background variables associated with problem-solving skills that can be of use in improving these competences in US adult education. In particular, the author will address the following three questions:

  1. What features can we extract from process data by subgroups with different employment status?
  2.  Clustering participants based on features extracted from process data, what do participants in each cluster have in common regarding employment-related variables? In other words, what are the characteristics of the clusters with respect to employment?
  3. Are the significant employment-related variables found from the first two research questions consistent across items?

Intergenerational Social Mobility in the United States (Sara Oloomi)
This paper will use PIAAC 2012/2014 United States data to study the impact of parental education on their children’s outcomes, including differences by sociodemographic characteristics and a specific look at the impact within STEM fields. The author will address the following questions:

  1. Is parental education associated with outcomes of their children, including education, employment status, occupational skill classification, earning, and cognitive skills (literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving scores) in the U.S.? 
    1. 1 Do the relationships between parental education and outcomes of children vary across different segments of the population including racial/ethnic and gender groups in the U.S.? 
  2. What are the ranges of relative and absolute upward mobility in education, employment status, occupational skill classification, earning, and cognitive skills (literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving scores) in the U.S.? 
  3. Is parental education associated with propensity to study/work in STEM? 

3.1 To what extent parental education is associated with the gender gap in study/work in STEM? Is the gender gap lower among children with high parental education compared to children with low parental education?

3.2 Do the relationships between parental education and propensity to study/work in STEM as well as gender gap in STEM vary across different racial/ethnic groups?  


Adults’ Civic Engagement in Germany and the US: Evidence from the PIAAC Survey (Amy D. Rose, Northern Illinois University; Jill Zarestky, Colorado State University; Tobin Lopes, Colorado State University; Marion Fleige, German Institute for Adult Education (DIE); M Cecil Smith, West Virginia University; Thomas J. Smith, Northern Illinois University; and Jovita M. Ross-Gordon, Texas State University)
This paper will examine the broad construct of civic engagement, comparing native born and non-native born individuals in the US and Germany.  Specifically, the authors will examine how several variables, including gender, years worked, work status, education, and age, predict outcomes related to civic engagement, including adults’ volunteer work activities, political efficacy, and social trust in the U.S. and Germany and how relationships these differ between the two countries by exploring the following questions:

  1. Among persons in Germany and the U.S., do skill proficiency, gender, years worked, work status, education, age, and immigration status predict specific aspects of civic engagement (i.e. volunteer work for non-profit organizations, political efficacy, and dimensions of social trust)? 
  2. Do the effects of skill proficiency, gender, years worked, work status, education, age, and immigration status predict specific aspects of civic engagement ((i.e. volunteer work for non-profit organizations, political efficacy, and dimensions of social trust) and do these differ between individuals in Germany and in the U.S.?
  3. What are the moderating effects of immigration status on the relationships between (1) skill proficiency gender, years worked, work status, education, and (2) specific aspects of civic engagement (volunteer work for non-profit organizations, political efficacy, and dimensions of social trust), and do any moderating effects differ between Germany and the U.S.?

The Changing Impact of Literacy Skill on Key Indicators of Macro-economic Performance in OECD Countries (Serge Coulombe, The University of Ottawa and Scott Murray, DataAngel Policy Research)

The authors will study the impact that changes in the average level of literacy skill and in the distribution of literacy skill have had on key indicators of macroeconomic performance including the rates of GDP growth and labor productivity growth in OECD economies using data from the 2003 ALL and the 2011 OECD PIAAC adult skills survey. The goal will be to highlight how these impacts have changed and to estimate the magnitude of lost output associated with skill loss. This latter analysis will shed light on the potential benefits of policy measures that would increase the demand for literacy skill enough to reduce skill loss to zero.


What Demographic and Skill-level Factors Predict the Desire to Enroll in a Postsecondary Education Class or Program Among People in Prison in the U.S.? (Ruth Delaney, Margaret diZerega, Lionel Smith, and Heather Erwin, Vera Institute of Justice) 
This paper will use 2014 PIAAC prison data to study demographic and skill-level factors that predict the desire to enroll in a postsecondary program among incarcerated adults detained in the U.S federal and state prisons.  The authors will study the following question:

  1. What demographic and skill-level factors impact which incarcerated adults want to enroll in a pre-associate education program or higher in comparison to their peers who do not want to enroll in any academic class or program of study?


Using the U.S. PIAAC Prison Data to Examine the Relationship between Cognitive Skills and Correctional Education Programs (Jinghong Cai, Anirudh V.S. Ruhil, and Dianne Gut, Ohio University)
This paper will use 2014 PIAAC prison data to study the association between literacy/numeracy and correctional education as it relates to program type, ways of course offerings, and job/education history prior to incarceration. Specifically, the author will examine the relationship between participation in correctional education programs while incarcerated and literacy/numeracy skills addressing the following research questions: 

  1. What are the characteristics of participants in different types of correctional education programs in terms of gender, race, age, parents’ immigration background, completed education level, and history of incarceration?
  2. To what extent is attending/not attending a correctional education program associated with the variation in levels of literacy and numeracy? What is the relationship between the time spent in correctional education programs and the level of literacy/numeracy?
  3. What is the distribution of learning via different ways of courses offering (i.e., offered in jail or correctional facility versus others such as offered by college/university through distance education) across academic programs (e.g., GED and degree programs)? What is the relationship between ways of course offering and the literacy/numeracy of participants?
  4.  What are the reported reasons for attending or not attending correctional education programs across different programs based on history of incarceration? Are there any commonalities among the reasons expressed by low and high literacy/numeracy groups for participating or not participating in correctional education programs? 

The Influence of Correctional Education, Skills, and Lifelong Learning on Social Outcomes  (Roofia Galeshi and Riane Bolin, Radford University)
This paper will use the 2014 PIAAC prison data to study whether numeracy and literacy skills along with inmate educational and vocational training have an impact on social outcomes. Specifically, they will address the following questions: 

  1. How does literacy, numeracy, formal education, and vocational training affect prison inmates’ social outcomes such as civic engagement, interpersonal trust, and health? 
  2. How does the relationship between literacy, numeracy, formal education, and vocational training and social outcomes compare in the two populations—prison and household?

Factors That Influence the Educational Attainment, Employment, Economic Mobility, and Successful Reentry of Incarcerated Parents (Daniel M. Leeds, Juliana Pearson, and Leslie Scott, CNA Education)
This paper will use 2014 PIAAC prison data to study factors that influence the educational attainment, employment, economic mobility, and successful reentry of the justice-involved parents.  Specifically, they will answer the following questions:

  1. What percent of the incarcerated population has one or more dependent children?
  2. Does the highest level of education for incarcerated parents with dependent children vary by literacy and numeracy skill levels (level 2 and below, level 3, and level 4/5)?
  3. What percent of incarcerated parents with dependent children were employed prior to incarceration? How do employment rates differ for incarcerated parents of varying literacy and numeracy skill levels (level 2 and below, level 3, and level 4/5)?
  4. What percent of incarcerated parents with dependent children were unemployed prior to incarceration? How do unemployment rates differ for incarcerated parents of varying literacy and numeracy skill levels (level 2 and below, level 3, and level 4/5)?
  5. For what percent of potential working years (equal to age minus [imputed] years of schooling minus six) were incarcerated parents with dependent children employed?  Does this differ systematically for incarcerated individuals without dependent children?
  6. Do income sources vary for incarcerated parents with dependent children by literacy and numeracy skill levels (level 2 and below, level 3, and level 4/5)?
  7. To what extent are the literacy and numeracy skills of incarcerated parents with dependent children influenced by the educational attainment of their parents?
  8. What percent of incarcerated parents with dependent children have expressed an interest in pursuing education and training while in prison? How does this compare with incarcerated individuals without dependent children?
  9. Are incarcerated parents with dependent children more likely than incarcerated individuals without dependent children to participate in education and training while in prison? What are the motivating factors?

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